RSO T+480 seconds. [8] A staff sergeant of the maintenance crew was killed while attempting a rescue and a total of twenty were hospitalized.[9]. [3] The USGS was already in use on the Titan III space launcher when work began in March 1978 to replace the Titan II guidance system. The Titan IIIA (an early test variant flown in 1964-65) and IIIB (flown from 1966-87 with an Agena D upper stage in both standard and extended tank variants) had no SRMs. Art Drawings Sketches . By entering the Museum facility and/or participating in a Museum activity or event, you consent to and authorize without restriction or compensation the possible use of your image and your accompanying group’s image appearing in photograph, audio, video or other formats which may be included in future media or marketing. Twelve Titan-II Gemini Launch Vehicles (GLVs) were produced. This preserved Titan II missile site, officially known as complex 571-7, is all that remains of the 54 Titan II missile sites that were on alert across the United States from 1963 to 1987. Clip length: 01:25. The Range Safety destruct command was sent, but it was unclear if the stage received it or if it had already broken up by that point. [1] The Titan III launchers provided assured capability and flexibility for launch of large-class payloads. The Titan Missile Museum, located in a former missile silo, is dedicated to preserving. Original codec: H.264. Frame rate: 24.0 fps. It was the first Titan booster to feature large solid rocket motors and was planned to be used as a launcher for the Dyna-Soar, though the spaceplane was cancelled before it could fly. The 98-foot-long, two-stage missile was fueled by kerosene (RP-1 fuel) and liquid oxygen, and was designed to carry nuclear warheads. The Titan 3 missile merges the technologies of the liquid fuel missiles and the solid fuel missiles. 2. RSO T+83 seconds. At the main control panel receiving an important call. The Titan IV could be launched with a Centaur upper stage, the USAF Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), or no upper stage at all. There are six former Titan I missile complexes in Colorado. [15][16][17] There was one fatality and 21 were injured,[18] all from the emergency response team from Little Rock AFB. While the Polaris, a solid-fuel missile, was developed at the same time as the Titan missiles for use in submarines, the military was attached to the Titan II for diplomatic reasons. [4], Liquid oxygen is dangerous to use in an enclosed space, such as a missile silo, and cannot be stored for long periods in the booster oxidizer tank. For the Titan III, the ASC-15 drum memory of the computer was lengthened to add 20 more usable tracks, which increased its memory capacity by 35%. The Titan IIIC weighed about 1,380,000 lb (626,000 kg) at liftoff and consisted of a two-stage Titan core and upper stage called the Titan Transtage, both burning hypergolic liquid fuel, and two large UA1205 solid rocket motors. Anyone searching for a truly unique overnight adventure has hit the target with a stay at the Titan II Nuclear Missile Complex. Each motor composed of five segments and was 10 ft (3.0 m) in diameter, 85 ft (26 m) long, and weighed nearly 500,000 lb (230,000 kg). The Titan II was deployed in a 1×9 configuration. This one-of-a kind museum gives visitors a rare look at the technology used by the United States to deter nuclear war. The HGM-25A Titan I, built by the Martin Company, was the first version of the Titan family of rockets. It began as a backup ICBM project in case the SM-65 Atlas was delayed. Commercial uses may be available, contact us. PlaneTags are: Authentic - made from actual retired aircraft fuselage, not merely stamped metal. As the IIIC consisted of mostly proven hardware, launch problems were generally only caused by the upper stages and/or payload. It used an Inertial measurement unit made by AC Spark Plug derived from original designs from the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory at MIT. [citation needed], The Titan IIIE, with a high-specific-impulse Centaur upper stage, was used to launch several scientific spacecraft, including both of NASA's two Voyager space probes to Jupiter, Saturn and beyond, and both of the two Viking missions to place two orbiters around Mars and two instrumented landers on its surface. The surviving N-10, AF Ser. Liang, A.C. and Kleinbub, D.L. AIAA Guidance and Control Conference, Key Biscayne, FL, 20–22 August 1973. Stage 0: Empty 33,798 kg/ea; Full 226,233 kg/ea. The USGS used a Carousel IV IMU and a Magic 352 computer. Thirty-three Titan-II Research Test (N-type) missiles were built and all but one were launched either at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, or Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, in 1962–64. The Martin Company was able to improve the design with the Titan II. They were all launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, due south over the Pacific into polar orbits. Jusqu'à 63 missiles ont été déployés sur le territoire des États-Unis contigus entre 1963 et 1987… The diameter of the second stage was increased to match the first stage. [30] Another used a cryogenic first stage with LOX/LH2 propellants; however the Atlas V EELV was selected for production instead. Le lanceur est dérivé du missile balistique intercontinental SM-68 Titan et est caractérisé par le recours à des ergols hypergoliques stockables. Around 80 seconds, the remainder of the shroud disintegrated, causing loss of launch vehicle control as well as the payload (a group of IDCSP satellites intended to provide radio communication for the US Army in Vietnam). $79 Choose a royalty-free license What license do I need? [citation needed], For orbital launches, there were strong advantages to using higher-performance liquid hydrogen or RP-1 (kerosene) fueled vehicles with a liquid oxygen oxidizer; the high cost of using hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide, along with the special care that was needed due to their toxicity, were a further consideration. First Titan flight test missile delivered - . Minuteman missile and Titan II missile blast out of missile silos. Up to 28,900 lb (13,100 kg) into a low Earth orbit with 28 degrees inclination. Two airmen were performing maintenance at Missile Complex 374-7, located 3 miles north of Damascus, the evening of September 18th. [6] The liquid fuel missiles were prone to developing leaks of their toxic propellants. 1920 x 1080 H.264. USAF Sheppard Technical Training Center. The first stage was powered by a pair of improved LR-87 rocket engines. The primary intelligence agency that needed the Titan IV's launch capabilities was the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO). The missile guidance computer (MGC) was the IBM ASC-15. The main reason was to reduce the cost of maintenance by $72 million per year; the conversions were completed in 1981. An airman dropped a wrench socket and it fell 80 feet and pierced the thin skin of the … Another slight modification to SRB-equipped Titans was the first stage engines being covered instead of the open truss structure on the Titan II/IIIA/IIIB. Transtage inertial measurement unit failure caused it to be stranded in low Earth orbit. It was a two-stage rocket operational from early 1962 to mid-1965 whose LR-87 booster engine was powered by RP-1 and liquid oxygen. Each squadron. U.S. Air Force photo. Image show & rendered using Cycle render. Titan IVs were also launched from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida for non-polar orbits. Titan III Rocket Missile 3D Model . Included Light, Camera and support object. 1 Overview 2 Camouflage 3 Munitions 3.1 AT 3.2 AP 4 Sensors 4.1 Infrared Sensor 5 … Il Titan è una famiglia di razzi vettori statunitensi non riutilizzabili. Both stages of the Titan I used kerosene (RP-1) and liquid oxygen (LOX) as propellants. Buy clothing, informative books and scale models of the Titan II Missile. However, it was also used for a purely scientific purpose to launch the NASA–ESA Cassini / Huygens space probe to Saturn in 1997. [3] Transtage contained about 22,000 lb (10,000 kg) of propellant and its engines delivered 16,000 lbf (71 kN). The 54 Titan IIs[21] in Arizona, Arkansas, and Kansas[18] were replaced in the U.S. arsenal by 50 MX "Peacekeeper" solid-fuel rocket missiles in the mid-1980s; the last Titan II silo was deactivated in May 1987. The third launch in December experienced a similar failure. It was developed on behalf of the United States Air Force as a heavy-lift satellite launcher to be used mainly to launch American military payloads and civilian intelligence agency satellites such as the Vela Hotel nuclear-test-ban monitoring satellites, observation and reconnaissance satellites (for intelligence-gathering), and various series of defense communications satellites. Titan vehicles were also used to lift US military payloads as well as civilian agency intelligence-gathering satellites and to send highly successful interplanetary scientific probes throughout the Solar System. On September 19, 1980, a second tragedy struck the 308th Strategic Missile Wing. Titan III: Research and Development for Today And Tomorrow, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Titan_IIIC&oldid=998097466, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, Transtage failed in low Earth orbit due to oxidizer tank leak, Transtage failed during 3rd burn due to stuck oxidizer valve; left payloads in. This Template lists historical, current, and future space rockets that at least once attempted (but not necessarily succeeded in) an orbital launch or that are planned to attempt such a launch in the future, This page was last edited on 28 November 2020, at 13:27. The first Titan II guidance system was built by AC Spark Plug. A subsequent version of the Titan family, the Titan II, was similar to the Titan I, but was much more powerful. AIAA Paper No. The RP-1/LOX combination was replaced by a room-temperature fuel whose oxidizer did not require cryogenic storage. Thankfully, they never did. The U.S. Air Force and the BLM partnered in the conversion of Titan Missile Site 570-3 into a historical interpretive site, this site is one of 18 across our state. "Titan III Inertial Guidance System," in AIAA Second Annual Meeting, San Francisco, 26–29 July 1965, pages 1–11. Descend 55 steps beneath the ground to reach the control center. Prison Art Prison Cell American System Reform Movement Innocent People County Jail. It became known as the Titan I, the nation's first two-stage ICBM, and replaced the Atlas ICBM as the second underground, vertically stored, silo-based ICBM. Additional expenses were generated by the ground operations and facilities for the Titan IV at Vandenberg Air Force Base for launching satellites into polar orbits. Handmade Aviation Tags. Another site at Potwin, Kansas leaked NTO oxidizer in April 1980 with no fatalities,[10] and was later closed. The HGM-25A Titan I, built by the Martin Company, was the first version of the Titan family of rockets. 73-905. [citation needed], The Titan IIID was the Vandenberg Air Force Base version of the Titan IIIC, without a Transtage, that was used to place members of the Key Hole series of reconnaissance satellites into polar low Earth orbits. Designated as LGM-25C, the Titan II was the largest USAF missile at the time and burned Aerozine 50 and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) rather than RP-1 and LOX. All Solid Rocket Motor (SRM)-equipped Titans (IIIC, IIID, IIIE, 34D, and IV) launched with only the SRMs firing at liftoff, the core stage not activating until T+105 seconds, shortly before SRM jettison. Pages 61–65. Designated the Titan 3A-1, this stage was powered by a twin nozzle Aerojet LR-87-AJ9 engine [4] that burned about 240,000 lb (110,000 kg) of Aerozine 50 and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and produced 1,941.7 kN (436,500 lbf) thrust over 147 seconds. the memory of this part of Cold War history and educating visitors. One Titan V proposal was for an enlarged Titan IV, capable of lifting up to 90,000 pounds (41,000 kg) of payload. In September 1980, at Titan II silo 374-7 near Damascus, Arkansas, a technician dropped an 8 lb (3.6 kg) socket that fell 70 ft (21 m), bounced off a thrust mount, and broke the skin of the missile's first stage,[11] over eight hours prior to an eventual explosion. To get a sense of how large the Titan was, the currently-deployed Minuteman missile weighs a third as much and its warhead has 1/25 the yield. Several Atlas and Titan I rockets exploded and destroyed their silos. These included:[citation needed], The Titan III family used the same basic LR-87 engines as Titan II (with performance enhancements over the years), however SRB-equipped variants had a heat shield over them as protection from the SRB exhaust and the engines were modified for air-starting. The space launch vehicle versions contributed the majority of the 368 Titan launches, including all the Project Gemini crewed flights of the mid-1960s. The ISDS activated automatically when one of the SRBs broke away from the stack and destroyed the entire launch vehicle. On March 25, 1978, a launch of a DSCS satellite ended up in the Atlantic Ocean when the Titan second stage hydraulic pump failed, resulting in engine shutdown approximately 470 seconds after launch. 3. [citation needed], When it was being produced, the Titan IV was the most powerful uncrewed rocket available to the United States, with proportionally high manufacturing and operations expenses. Titan missile A-3, now scheduled for the first Titan flight test, was delivered to the Air Force by the Martin Company.. 1959 January 19 - . (Photos: Richard Kruse, 2009) Titan II. The Titan rocket family was established in October 1955 when the Air Force awarded the Glenn L. Martin Company (later Martin Marietta and now Lockheed Martin) a contract to build an intercontinental ballistic missile (SM-68). "Student Study Guide, Missile Launch/Missile Officer (LGM-25)." 1. The upper stage, the Titan Transtage, also burned Aerozine 50 and NTO. [citation needed], The Titan IIIB with its different versions (23B, 24B, 33B, and 34B) had the Titan III core booster with an Agena D upper stage. Some families include both missiles and carrier rockets; they are listed in both groups. Titan 3B Launched, Aviation Week & Space Technology, August 8, 1966, page 29, Second Viking Launched Prior to Thunderstorm, Aviation Week & Space Technology, September 15, 1975, page 20, Titan III Research and Development - 1967 US Air Force Educational Documentary, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, "Blast is second serious mishap in 17-year-old U.S. Titan fleet", "1 killed, 6 injured when fuel line breaks at Kansas Titan missile site", "Thunderhead Of Lethal Vapor Kills Airman At Missile Silo", "Airman at Titan site died attempting rescue", "Air Force plugs leak in Kansas missile silo", "Warhead apparently moved from Arkansas missile site", "Caution advice disregarded at Titan missile site? Let’s explore this underground retreat in 3, 2, 1: We’re aware that these uncertain times are limiting many aspects of life. "Navigation of the Titan IIIC space launch vehicle using the Carousel VB IMU." La NASA l'a également utilisé de manière marginale pour lancer tous les vaisseaux du programme Gemini ainsi que quelques sondes spatiales telles que Cassini. The fifth Titan IIIC (August 26, 1966) failed shortly after launch when pieces of the payload fairing started breaking off. Titan was a family of United States expendable rockets used between 1959 and 2005. The same first-stage rocket engine was used with some modifications. Launch Vehicle: Titan II. [2] Using radar data, it made course corrections during the burn phase. [23], The Titan III was a modified Titan II with optional solid rocket boosters. [14] As the problem was being attended to at around 3 a.m.,[13] leaking rocket fuel ignited and blew the 8,000 lb (3,630 kg) nuclear warhead out of the silo. The solid motors were ignited on the ground and were designated "stage 0". The last IIIC was launched in March 1982. Hold on as you sit through a simulated missile launch. The second launch in October 1965 failed when the Transtage suffered an oxidizer leak and was unable to put its payload (several small satellites) into the correct orbit. When spares for this system became hard to obtain, it was replaced by a more modern guidance system, the Delco Electronics Universal Space Guidance System (USGS). A.C. Liang and D.L. [22] The 54 Titan IIs had been fielded along with a thousand Minuteman missiles from the mid-1960s through the mid-1980s. All were launched from th… They produced a combined 2,380,000 lbf (10,600 kN) thrust at sea level and burned for approximately 115 seconds. Choose a size. The Godly man. Kleinbub. This rocket was used almost exclusively to launch US military or Central Intelligence Agency payloads. "Navigation of the Titan IIIC space launch vehicle using the Carousel VB IMU". Their maximum payload mass was about 7,500 lb (3,000 kg). The second core stage, the Titan 3A-2, contained about 55,000 lb (25,000 kg) of propellant and was powered by a single Aerojet LR-91-AJ9, which produced 453.7 kN (102,000 lbf) for 145 seconds.[4]. [28][29], The Titan IV was an extended length Titan III with solid rocket boosters on its sides. Titan Missile Museum, Sahuarita Picture: 3 - Check out Tripadvisor members' 1,050 candid photos and videos. All of the launches were successful. Titan I and Titan II were part of the US Air Force's intercontinental ballistic missile fleet until 1987. By RetroFootage Editorial. All Titan II/III/IV vehicles contained a special range safety system known as the Inadvertent Separation Destruction System (ISDS) that would activate and destroy the first stage if there was a premature second stage separation. Enter the missile silo for a 6-story view of the 103-foot (30-meter) warhead. Both stages of the Titan I used kerosene (RP-1) and liquid oxygen (LOX) as propellants. A number of HGM-25A Titan I and LGM-25C Titan II missiles have been distributed as museum displays across the United States. A series of critical authorization checks had to be carried out, verified and then rechecked by another person. The Titan missile, deployed from 1959 to 1987 was the largest ICBM deployed by the United States and delivered a 9 megaton nuclear bomb. The first Titan IIIC flew on June 18, 1965 and was the most powerful launcher used by the Air Force until it was replaced by the Titan 34D in 1982. As a result of these events and improvements in technology, the unit cost of a Titan IV launch was very high. Payload fairing broke up at T+78 seconds. 4. Find the perfect Titan Missile stock photos and editorial news pictures from Getty Images. At a silo outside Rock, Kansas, an oxidizer transfer line carrying nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) ruptured on August 24, 1978. Employes in the Denver Area Witness the Award Presentation Friday A Titan 3 missile is in the background as the Air Force... Lowry Air Force Base* Titan Missile Base; Fidel Salazar of Phoenix, Ariz., cuts away bolts with a cutting torch. It was a two-stage rocket operational from early 1962 to mid-1965 whose LR-87 booster engine was powered by RP-1 and liquid oxygen. AIAA Paper No. May 1967. The Titan IVB was the last Titan rocket to remain in service, making its penultimate launch from Cape Canaveral on 30 April 2005, followed by its final launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base on 19 October 2005, carrying the USA-186 optical imaging satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO). The Titan I was one of the first strategic, intercontinental ballistic missiles developed by the United States. Available at WikiMedia Commons: TitanII MGC.pdf. The fuel was Aerozine 50, a 50/50 mix of hydrazine and UDMH, and the oxidizer was nitrogen tetroxide. Up to 6,600 lb (3,000 kg) into a geosynchronous transfer orbit when launched from, This Template lists historical, current, and future space rockets that at least once attempted (but not necessarily succeeded in) an orbital launch or that are planned to attempt such a launch in the future, * - Japanese projects using US rockets or stages, This page was last edited on 3 January 2021, at 20:19. Chicano Federal. 5. Test launch of a Titan II from a silo. Titan III/IV SRBs were fixed nozzle and for roll control, a small tank of nitrogen tetroxide was mounted to each motor. Second stage hydraulics pump failure. It became known as the Titan I, the nation's first two-stage ICBM, and replaced the Atlas ICBM as the second underground, vertically stored, silo-based ICBM. Transtage 3rd burn failure left satellite in unusable lower than planned orbit. Titan I. The Titan II Missile sites were located in three places in the U.S. as a deterrent to nuclear war during the cold war period–Arkansas, Kansas and Arizona and they were manned 24/7 for 24 years, from 1963 to 1987. [citation needed], The first guidance system for the Titan III used the AC Spark Plug company IMU (inertial measurement unit) and an IBM ASC-15 guidance computer from the Titan II. This required complex guidance and instrumentation. Main floor of the Launch Control Center inside a long abandoned Titan Missile Silo near Tucson, Arizona, where crews had the ability to launch a nuclear warhead if the orders came. A subsequent version of the Titan family, the Tit… The first Titan II missile in Arkansas was installed in a silo near Searcy in 1963. Des versions de plus en plus puissantes ont été développées pou… consisted of nine separate launch facilities, each housing a single missile . Titan I Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) Titan I ICBM on display at the Air Force Space and Missile Museum. [12] The puncture occurred about 6:30 p.m.[13] and when a leak was detected shortly after, the silo was flooded with water and civilian authorities were advised to evacuate the area. [25][26], The Titan IIIA was a prototype rocket booster and consisted of a standard Titan II rocket with a Transtage upper stage. 73-905. The majority of the launcher's payloads were DoD satellites, for military communications and early warning, though one flight (ATS-6) was performed by NASA. The solid-fuel boosters that were developed for the Titan IIIC represented a significant engineering advance over previous solid-fueled rockets, due to their large size and thrust, and their advanced thrust-vector control systems. Paul O. Larson. The Titan IIIC was launched exclusively from Cape Canaveral while its sibling, the Titan IIID, was launched only from Vandenberg AFB. LV Family: Titan. The Titan II used the LR-87-5 engine, a modified version of the LR-87, that used a hypergolic propellant combination of nitrogen tetroxide for its oxidizer and Aerozine 50 (a 50/50 mix of hydrazine and UDMH) instead of the liquid oxygen and RP-1 propellant of the Titan I. Starting in the late 1980s, some of the deactivated Titan IIs were converted into space launch vehicles to be used for launching U.S. Government payloads. [5] Check out our titan missiles selection for the very best in unique or custom, handmade pieces from our shops. 61-2738/60-6817 resides in the silo at the Titan Missile Museum (ICBM Site 571-7), operated by the Pima Air & Space Museumat Green Valley, south of Tucson, Arizona, on Interstate-19. Titan est une famille de lanceurs lourds, qui furent utilisés entre 1959 et 2005 pour placer en orbite les satellites militaires américains de grande taille. The Titan Missile Museum, also known as Air Force Facility Missile Site 8 or as Titan II ICBM Site 571-7, is a former ICBM missile site located at 1580 West Duval Mine Road, Sahuarita, Arizona in the United States. The Titan MPRL Compact (full name: Titan Multi-Purpose Rocket Launcher - Compact) is a 127 mm missile launcher used by several BLUFOR, OPFOR and Independent factions in ArmA 3. Nation: USA. The Titan I could hold a W38 or W49 warhead with explosive power of 3.75 megatons or 1.44 megatons respectively. The Titan IIIC was an expendable launch system used by the United States Air Force from 1965 until 1982. The exact reason for the shroud failure was not determined, but the fiberglass payload shrouds used on the Titan III up to this point were replaced with a metal shroud afterwards. Larson, Paul O. Ce successeur du missile Titan I d'une portée de 10 000 km est capable de lancer une charge deux fois plus lourde que son prédécesseur et contrairement à ce dernier utilise des ergols dits « stockables ». The ground guidance for the Titan was the UNIVAC ATHENA computer, designed by Seymour Cray, based in a hardened underground bunker. If the call ever came through to launch it would take between 3 and a half and 5 minutes before the missile would launch. Afterward, purchase souvenirs from the Titan Missile Museum gift shop. This was to protect the engines from the heat of the SRB exhaust. "Titan III Inertial Guidance System," page 4. - . No. The first core stage ignited about 5 seconds before SRM jettison. This combination was used to launch the KH-8 GAMBIT series of intelligence-gathering satellites. The targets of these are unknown. Titan II ICBM (SM-68B) The Titan II ICBM, developed from the Titan I missile, was first flown successfully on 16 March 1962. It landed harmlessly several hundred feet away. I Titan più recenti sono chiamati Titan-Centaur perché utilizzano un ultimo stadio Centaur.In passato esisteva anche la versione Titan-Agena, in cui l'ultimo stadio era costituito da un razzo Agena.La maggior parte dei razzi vettore Titan sono derivati dal missile balistico intercontinentale Titan II. Its two Aerojet AJ-10-138 engines were restartable, allowing flexible orbital operations including orbital trimming, geostationary transfer and insertion, and delivery of multiple payloads to different orbits. Some Material added modifier by Sub-Division before rendering. Most of the Titan rockets were the Titan II ICBM and their civilian derivatives for NASA. [7] An ensuing orange vapor cloud forced 200 rural residents to evacuate the area. [citation needed], Most of the decommissioned Titan II ICBMs were refurbished and used for Air Force space launch vehicles, with a perfect launch success record. Select from premium Titan Missile of the highest quality. Find great deals on eBay for titan 2 missile. The ISDS would end up being used a few times over the Titan's career. [citation needed], The Titan III core was similar to the Titan II, but had a few differences. It began as a backup ICBM project in case the SM-65 Atlas was delayed. The Titan II's hypergolic fuel and oxidizer ignited on contact, but they were highly toxic and corrosive liquids. Silo-launched Titan approved. Le LGM-25C Titan II est un missile balistique intercontinental conçu et mis au point par la Glenn L. Martin Company pour l'US Air Force. Titan I missile. The control panel showing the 3 targets of the Titan II missile. The Titan rocket family was established in October 1955 when the Air Force awarded the Glenn L. Martin Company (later Martin Marietta and now Lockheed Martin) a contract to build an intercontinental ballistic missile (SM-68). Most of the Titan rockets were the Titan II ICBM and their civilian derivatives for NASA. [13][19] The explosion blew the 740-ton launch tube cover 200 ft (60 m) into the air and left a crater 250 feet (76 m) in diameter.[20]. Site Configuration. Titan I's were configured with three missiles per site, with the first missile taking at least 15 minutes, and the 2nd and 3rd missiles in 7 1/2 minutes to launch. Release: Editorial. In August 1965, 53 construction workers were killed in Arkansas when hydraulic fluid used in the Titan II caught fire from a welder's torch in a missile silo northwest of Searcy. [citation needed]. ", "Titan warhead is reported lying in Arkansas woods", "Titan II: 54 accidents waiting to happen", "America's last Titan 2 nuclear missile is deactivated", "U.S. weather satellite finally escapes grasp of hard luck", http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a007056.pdf, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Titan_(rocket_family)&oldid=991137754, Intercontinental ballistic missiles of the United States, Military space program of the United States, Articles with unsourced statements from July 2019, Articles with unsourced statements from January 2018, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, Thicker tank walls and ablative skirts to support the added weight of upper stages, Radio ground guidance in place of the inertial guidance on ICBM Titan IIs, Guidance package placed on the upper stages (if present), Removal of retrorockets and other unnecessary ICBM hardware.